Last night was the final straw. I’ve long been a fan of 24. In the beginning it was seminal and ground breaking. Now? It has become a parody of itself and I’m not going to bother tuning in for season 7 (or the inevitable season 8, 9 etc).

WARNING: Spoiler alert – divert your eyes if you haven’t seen it yet!

After the truly affecting train yard scene with Ryan Shappel in season 3 perhaps we had hit the pinnacle. Season 4 started to loose its way. It ticked all the boxes but you felt you had seen it all before. Season five started badly. You knew they were in bad shape when President Palmer got smoked (I know, I know, he’s gone to do his own show ‘The Unit’). Then season six made a bad situation worse when Wayne Palmer was Commander in Chief (the man has as much gravitas as Ken Barlow). However, nearing the season six finale, here was the killer moment for me… Jack’s nephew being taken away by Doyle and placed in the helicopter. You know the bit – as it lifts away the kid looks directly at us and though we can’t hear it, we see him mouthing ‘UNCLE JACK!’ It was SOOOOOOO trite. The smell of cheese was so pungent it was enough to make a Frenchman blush. I literally laughed out loud.

I put up with more ‘Copy that’ than I care to mention. I suffered countless ‘Right now I need you to…’ and so many other catch phrases but NO MORE! The seasons’ plot has more holes than a teabag! How easy is it to break into CTU? I mean are they really expecting us to swallow the notion that all you have to do to break in CTU is to put on a muscle vest, enter the sewers and as long as a giant turd doesn’t stop you in your tracks you can hold the entire place to ransom?

ENOUGH! Just like so many other successful series before, 24 has made the transition from artistic pioneer into executive cash cow (Remember X-files?) and every week you can hear the ‘moo’s’ as that poor old cow is milked for all it’s worth.

Ah well, it was good while it lasted.

Roll on Lost season 4…

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